Jo Boaler

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Jo Boaler

Jo Boaler is a professor of mathematics education at Stanford University.

Publications

Boaler, J. (2008). Promoting "relational equity" and high mathematics achievement through an innovative mixed‐ability approach. British Educational Research Journal, 34(2), 167–194. doi:10.1080/01411920701532145

Boaler, J. (2008). What's math got to do with it? How parents and teachers can help children learn to love their least favorite subject (p. 273). New York, NY: Penguin Group.

Boaler, J., & Staples, M. (2008). Creating mathematical futures through an equitable mathematics approach: The case of Railside School. Teachers College Record, 110(3), 608–645.

Boaler, J. (2002). Experiencing school mathematics: Traditional and reform approaches to teaching and their impact on student learning. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Boaler, J. (2002). Learning from teaching: Exploring the relationship between reform curriculum and equity. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 33(4), 239– 258.

Boaler, J. (2002). Paying the price for "Sugar and Spice": Shifting the analytical lens in equity research. Mathematical Thinking and Learning, 4(2-3), 127–144. doi:10.1207/S15327833MTL04023_3

Boaler, J. (2002). The development of disciplinary relationships: Knowledge, practice and identity in mathematics classrooms. For the Learning of Mathematics, 22(1), 42–47.

Boaler, J., & Greeno, J. G. (2000). Identity, agency, and knowing in mathematics worlds. In Boaler, J. (Ed.), Multiple perspectives on mathematics teaching and learning (pp. 171–200). Westport, CT: Ablex Publishing.

Boaler, J. (1998). Open and closed mathematics: Student experiences and understandings. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 29(1), 41–62.

Boaler, J. (1997). Experiencing school mathematics: Teaching styles, sex, and setting. Buckingham, UK: Open University Press.

Boaler, J. (1994). When do girls prefer football to fashion? An analysis of female underachievement in relation to "realistic" mathematic contexts. British Educational Research Journal, 20(5), 551–564. doi:10.1080/0141192940200504